Your First-Person Essay or Memoir

Just dropping in to let you know about the new review I just posted at http://thenewbookreview.blogspot.com/2010/08/your-first-person-essay-or-memoir-your.html . Writers will want to know about this book, they should also know about The New Book Review. It's open to all books, all reviewers. Guidelines for submissions are in the left column.

My best to all of you VBT subscribers!
Carolyn Howard-Johnson

Indie-Debut 2010 Interview Feature with C. Lee McKenzie, The Write Game













M E D I A  R E L E A S E

CONTACT: Donna M. McDine

Children’s Author

Email: dmcdine@optonline.net

Phone: 845-721-7802

For Immediate Release

Indie-Debut 2010 Interview Feature with C. Lee McKenzie, The Write Game

The Write Game http://writegame.blogspot.com/ hosted by C. Lee McKenzie is your one stop place to learn about up and coming debut writers in various genres. McKenzie is quite the accomplished author with several middle grade and young adult books to her credit, coupled with her experience teaching inter-cultural English and studies in American Language at San Jose State University. This makes for the perfect visit for the authors of Indie-Debut 2010 http://indiedebut2010.blogspot.com/.

Come along for this intriguing interview on Thursday, August 19 at http://writegame.blogspot.com/ and meet:

Lori Calabrese, The Bug That Plagued the Entire Third Grade

Danika Dinsmore, Brigitta of the White Forest

Donna McDine, The Golden Pathway

Jo Ramsey, Connection

Beth Reinke, In My Bath

Be sure to leave a comment and or question, each author will check in throughout the day to field your comments and questions. Visitors participating in the contest point system please see further details within the Indie-debut 2010 interview. Don’t miss out on the chance to win a special giveaway tote bag with special treats.

Thank you in advance for your interest.

###

A Quick Guide to Narrative Writing

"So what happened?"


When someone asks you that, what do you say? You respond by telling a story - when it happened, where it happened, how it happened and why it happened.

This is what we call narration.

If descriptive writing aims to appeal to your reader's five senses, narrative writing aims to tell an event that occurred by providing details.

Description and narration, when used correctly in writing, greatly contribute to a story's success.

Ingredients for an effective (good) narration

1. Supply all significant details or events. They are important in building up and supporting your main idea or story.


2. Flush out insignificant details. Don't start talking about how expensive your cousin's lipstick is if you're narrating her job interview disaster.

3. Narrate in a logical and organized way. Don't go from one detail to the next without providing any obvious transitions to aid comprehension.

4. Pace your narration. Don't let it drag. Otherwise, you'll risk boring your readers.

5. Make a point or lead to a conclusion.

Your Narrative Detail


What should you include in your narration? It's always effective to begin by identifying the who, what, when, where, why and how.

However, some writers get carried away and end up including too many details to suit their readers.

Instead of overcrowding your narrative with details, decide which ones are vital to your story, which ones you should emphasize, and which ones are minor but significant details.

Your Readers Influence Your Narrative

Your target readers largely determine the details you include in your narration.

Ask yourself -

1. Who would be likely to read my story?


2. Who could benefit and/or learn from my story?

3. Who are the people I'd like to share my story with?

Arranging Your Details and Using Conversation


The most logical way to present details in your story is by chronologically narrating them. However, it's also possible to begin your narrative using flash back and other similar literary devices. The important thing is that your narrative is cohesive and the details are organized.

Dialogues enhance and advance the meaning of your story so don't be afraid to include them in your narrative.

Now It's Your Turn

Now it's your turn. Write short narratives using the following prompts -

1. a memorable event


2. the strangest thing you've experienced

3. what happened to you earlier today

4. an embarrassing moment

5. your birthday last year



About Shery Ma Belle Arrieta-Russ: Shery is the creator of WriteSparks!™- a software that generates over 10 *million* Story Sparkers for Writers. Download WriteSparks!™ Lite for free at http://writesparks.com