Showing posts with label writing craft. Show all posts
Showing posts with label writing craft. Show all posts

Purposeful Writing

 

Purposeful Writing: Use Freewriting by Deborah Lyn Stanley

Purposeful writing is knowing why we are writing and who we wish to serve. What is special about our writing that readers can’t just get from the next blogger?

At a loss of what to write? Need to generate ideas? Or, do you want to tell your message in a unique way? I suggest you consider freewriting the topic you have chosen, or one that is your favorite. Make a list of prompts for yourself to use for freewriting, and several photos that tell a story.

Start writing and watch the topic come alive!

Once we have our article drafted, we’ll review it for clarity, grammar improvements, plus description changes to stronger verbs and nouns. Read it aloud. Consider any changes you wish to make to the point of view.

Let’s take a closer look at how to use freewriting to inspire your article or story:
1) Choose prompts that kindle your writing, be it a word, a phrase, or a poem that stirs up a memory or your imagination.
2) Make it fiction, a true story, or part of a memoir.
3) All freewrites are good, there is never a perfect freewrite!
4) Write whatever comes to your mind. It doesn’t have to make sense, just keep writing for ~20 minutes. Write the story you see in your mind’s eye.
5) You are writing for yourself as a starting point for your topic, then you will develop the topic it to get your message across and flowing.

More info about freewriting:
Masterclass.com
https://www.masterclass.com/articles/how-to-improve-your-writing-with-freewriting

The Write Spot – Jumpstart Program  (See the “Blog” for prompts)   https://thewritespot.us/

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.

Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/

Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love is available:
on Amazon



 
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Focus on the Heart Writing

 



By Deborah Lyn Stanley
As you begin your article, blog post, story, or book, focus on its heart. Heart is what the reader wants and narrowing the focus is great for your writing. Plus, remember this is a draft, we will have ample opportunity to make changes and polish this first draft as we move forward with our piece.

Outlining first, last, or in-between? To outline is often a topic of discussion among writers. A few prepare a rough outline, with some detailing every chapter from the beginning through to the end. Mapping an entire book is rare, though some are successful at this type of  detailing. In my mind, the successful authors of this method have been cooking their book for some time. Their layout steps and the details within them flow more readily!

Since we discover much as we write, it appears the freedom of going with the flow of the story and the main character’s actions is best. I need an outline of some sort, even if it is just some guide points noted for the next day’s scene.

Satisfying stories are character driven: about people, weaknesses and strengths, best moments and failures. These hold interest as we identify with the characters.

It is the same for the writer. As the writer identifies with the character or characters, depending on the length of the project, we have more to say. You will find your voice there too, because the words flow naturally and reflect the writer. The syntax, rhythm, tone and pacing all make up voice. Aim for your natural voice, and you’ve found it!

Reading our work out loud is the hearing test. How about revising while listening to your-own reading of your piece?

Now for some fun story tips:
https://www.writing.ie/resources/the-art-of-writing-a-drabble-really-useful-links-by-amanda-j-evans/
by Amanda Evans

A Drabble (100 words exactly), Short Fiction (500-1500 words), & Flash Fiction (commonly a 1,000-word limit.) These include a flow of events as beginning, middle, and end. Being acquainted with various structures can help us and resolve expected questions for readers. It’s about assisting the connection of events and noting significant points within the piece.

Seven story structures every writer should know by Reedsy (In essence, structure refers to the order and pacing of the events, a roadmap.)
https://blog.reedsy.com/guide/story-structure/ 
 
Now that we’ve established the most essential components of story, let’s look at seven of the most
popular story structures used by writers — and how they deploy these components.
1.    Freytag's Pyramid
2.    The Hero's Journey
3.    Three Act Structure
4.    Dan Harmon's Story Circle
5.    Fichtean Curve
6.    Save the Cat Beat Sheet
7.    Seven-Point Story Structure


Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction.
She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.

Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/

 


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Growing Your Authorship ID

 

by Deborah Lyn Stanley

In the world of writing and authorship, success depends upon visibility. Website Platform contains all the ways our work is found using metadata and SEO search tools. We often hear about brand. Brand is who you are, built-up by your words, and the graphics you choose. We aim to communicate with clarity and deliver inspiring content that motivates action.

Every piece you write advances expert status in your field. That’s what leveling up is about. A consistent writing practice, free writing and exploring various forms will expand your experience and stretch your skills. What if you find a style or form that captures your attention and inspires a change of direction—maybe Essays, Literary Journalism, Poetry, Journals or Storytelling. How about book reviews or writing true stories?

The key thing is to understand your creative process, go with it and know for whom you are writing. Do you use mind maps, post-it notes on a whiteboard for brainstorming, an inspiration collage board, music, writing at a coffee shop, or solo in your office? Follow your style. Then be ready to pitch your ideas to readers for feedback. What topics would be of most interest? If you belong to a group on Facebook, setting up a survey is easy. Otherwise send out a survey to your online subscribers, and post it on your website or blog.

Writing for your niche audience is a worthwhile endeavor. The focus becomes a message for their benefit and inspiration. The reader finds value, tells others and returns to see your next article.

A theme that best serves the reader’s needs also applies to writing in a series. Series writing guides the author’s focus, consistently meeting the reader’s expectations.

A great tool for creativity and research is your commonplace book or journal.
Use it for writing your next article, essay or blog post.



Helpful Links:

Carolyn Howard-Johnson: How to Get Great Book Reviews Frugally and Ethically:
How to Get Great Book Reviews Frugally and Ethically: on Amazon   

Telling True Stories: Nonfiction Writer’s Guide–Multiple Contributors
https://www.amazon.com/Telling-True-Stories-Nonfiction-Foundation

Commonplace Books: History & Tips https://www.writersonthemove.com/2021/06/commonplace-books-history-follow-up-tips.html


Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/
 

Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love
https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Lyn-Stanley/
& https://books2read.com/b/valuestories


 

 

 


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Tips for Promoting Your Articles

 

Keep building your inventory. Rewrite sections of your book as segment posts or short stories. Collect your old writing pieces and rewrite, modify or revised them. Write about new things you learn and ideas you explore. Use descriptive details to make stories & articles resonate, then promote, promote, promote.
Like Carolyn Howard-Johnson says in The Frugal Book Promoter: Recycle your Creative Work!

Marketing and promoting our work is simply sharing what we love and find important with the people who appreciate hearing about it. We’re after attracting like-minded people who need or would enjoy our stories, articles and books. Marketing is not force-feeding: it’s sharing with those interested.

Marketing is about the reader. We need to know to whom we are writing, and what they are looking for. How will our article or book benefit the reader? This guides and helps us deliver our best work.

As a caregiver, I write stories for caregivers that will resonate and help them meet the needs of the day.

Ways to publish:
• Traditional publishing for books, in magazines and periodicals
• On Line opportunities range from Blogging, Websites, Facebook Pages and Videos, YouTube, etc.
   - The best advice I can give is to own your blog and website. Things change. You don’t want your hard work controlled by someone else. Owning essentially means paying for hosting
   - Plus, if you have an email list of readers, you want control of that information
   - If you choose to go the free route, there are several opportunities for websites and blogs available

Metadata is also a vehicle for promoting your work. Metadata is information about your book, the title, sub-title, sales description, categories and author bio. It helps bookstores and online retailers list your work in the best area(s) for visibility per your description. Metadata can also help optimize your website and blog SEO for readers searching for your work.

Find the perfect promo fit for you and your work. That way it will work for you.
To get online attention for your stories, articles and books consider using:
•    Posts on your own Blog Site, your LinkedIn page, Facebook page, or Medium
•    Posts, images and videos on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest and more
•    Podcasts on iTunes, Sound Cloud and various audio platforms
•    Free webinars or collaborative summits
•    Newsletters and email blasts

Readers want personable, well-written works they can relate to, and find beneficial.
Write from the heart first, then polish for publication.

Book List:
*Successful Self-Publishing—How to Self-Publish and Market Your Book, by Joanna Penn
*The Frugal Book Promoter—How to Get Nearly Free Publicity on Your Own… by Carolyn Howard-Johnson

 

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/
Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love -- on Amazon

Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour

 

 

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Tips For Success

 

 Tips for Success: Descriptive Writing  by Deborah Lyn Stanley

Descriptive details make your stories and articles successful. But you must promote your work. Get your work in magazines, post online, or write the book or script you’ve been envisioning!

I’m reading The Story Cure by Dinty W. Moore. Chapter 2 presents beginnings that work and those that don’t. For today’s readers, we need to start strong and get to it. Dive into the story without lengthy flourish but not stiff hard-as-rock description. Dinty also cautions against awkward similes, and lengthy exposition that makes for taking a nap.

In addition, Rebecca McClanahan talks about descriptive writing denoting an atmosphere beneath our stories, poems, or essays. The language of description shapes the tone, and points to an underlying theme, the depth of the subject. Descriptive writing creates mood. There is so much more to our writing than scene, characters, dialogue, figures of speech, senses, mood and POV. Let’s call it atmosphere. How we pull a message all together matters; our delivery matters and effects how our readership can or cannot receive our message.

Sounds complicated, so how we proceed? I suggest, write your message from your heart first. Make it personable. As you polish the draft, consider the tips and techniques offered here to help polish your piece. For example, maybe the overall tone, voice inflection and body language, doesn’t support the theme or premise of the essay. You’ll want to make changes to align the tone with the theme.

Scenes bring the reader a firsthand view of the action. Exposition describes the what and the why. Using scenes, exposition, and telling shape the narrative. Blend and balance for delightful reading.
Readers want personable, well-written works they relate to, and find beneficial. Let’s give them our best shot.

Do you have words from your basket to share with us? Please add your favorites as you share on social media. We’d enjoy seeing them! Don’t have favorites yet? Consider sensory adjectives, strong verbs, and nouns from online lists or Thesaurus.
Nouns List:  https://www.thoughtco.com/learn-the-most-important-english-nouns-4087688
Strong Verb List: http://boyden8la.weebly.com/uploads/2/1/9/7/21975608/strong_verbs.pdf

Book List:
•    The Story Cure, a Book Doctor’s Pain-Free Guide to Finishing Your Novel or Memoir, by Dinty W. Moore
•    Word Painting, by Rebecca McClanahan

Earlier Post links in this series—Descriptive Writing for Fiction and Non-Fiction:
Write Strong:   http://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/10/tips-to-make-characters-real-write.html
Tips for Balancing Action and Exposition: https://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/11/tips-for-balancing-action-exposition.html
 

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. 

Visit her writer’s website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   

Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/

Available on Amazon --- Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love   https://www.amazon.com/author/deborahlynstanley

Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour

 


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Tips to Make Characters Real: Write Strong

 


Tips to Make Characters Real: Write Strong

Readers are looking for strong stories and narratives they can relate to; descriptive details are the driver. Readers want to meet our characters. It’s up to us to shape characters by describing the details of what they are doing, smelling, hearing, seeing, touching or tasting.

To make characters relatable and lively, choose the details that distinguish them. Ask, what makes that character catch attention? How can I give the reader more information that develops their impression of the character? Is he shy? How will I express his shyness, self-importance or anger?  Does she choose to wear a pantsuit or colorful huge flower beachwear? Describe how people react when they see or speak to him or her.

Bring the reader into the scene with emphasis. Does a fierce black dog charge him while rides his bike on the trail? Is a knock on the front door frightful and foreboding? How do people act when anywhere near his cigar smoke that chokes them? Oh, fresh baked bread at the coffee shop! Let’s go, s'il vous plaît!

Details will be brief if a character has a minor role in the story, but it may grow as the story unfolds.

I’ve heard about the fun practice of preparing a word basket (or jar) filled with scraps of paper—one word per scrap. The basket could become your go-to place for inspiring creative descriptions in a story or metaphor: paradox or poem. What words catch your attention? Grab it and add it to your basket. Consider sensory adjectives, strong verbs, and nouns. Here are some: flood, moon, glow, crack, sputter, knock, blossom, mirror, distort, dominate, negate, underpin, float, sink, water, precipice, or crag. Have fun; pull a random page from your dictionary to get started. My fav right now is s'il vous plaît.

Things easy to do— but best to avoid:
•    Beware of description dumps.
•    Traveling tangents—Stay on point.
•    Slowing down your story or narrative—Use whatever works for moving it forward.

Book suggestions for descriptive writing growth:
•    Understanding Show, Don’t Tell, by Janice Hardy
•    Make a Scene, by Jordan Rosenfeld
•    Word Painting, by Rebecca McClanahan

Earlier Post links in this series—Descriptive Writing for Fiction and Non-Fiction:
Tips for Character Driven Description: http://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/09/tips-for-character-driven-description.html

Senses & POV Tips:  http://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/07/senses-pov-tips-descriptive-writing.html

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her writer’s website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/
Available on Amazon --- Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love
https://www.amazon.com/author/deborahlynstanley
Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour

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Tips for Character Driven Description

 

 

Tips for Character Driven Description: Fiction and Non-fiction

Our stories or narratives include characters, and are stronger by using descriptive details that drive and support the topic.

When we first meet a person, we get a sense of who they are and perhaps their occupation. That happens through details we notice; how they dress, how they talk, the way they move or how they treat others. My hubby and I walk each morning. Several other neighbors walk daily about the same time. I can often recognize a neighbor before I can see them clearly, because I recognize the way they walk. I bet you have this experience too.

Our readers need to meet our characters in the same way. It’s up to us to shape characters in our stories by describing the details of how our character talks, moves and dresses. Does she speak with an accent? Does he limp as he walks? Is she a casual runner or one training for an event? Does she wear a big floppy hat as she bikes with her fluffy puppy in her flowered basket? Our characters further develop the scenes we paint for our readers.

Choose details that distinguish your character. What makes that character catch your attention? What gives the reader more information about that character? Does he have body language that expresses shyness, self-importance or condescension?  What is she wearing, a business suit or sweats? You get the idea.

Now pull from the sense words we’ve talked about for: sight, sound, smell, taste, and texture enhanced descriptions.

If the character you are describing has a minor role in the story, the details would be brief. The waitress serving a cup of hot chocolate might be a sweet young college student with bouncy blonde hair. And, that’s all you mention initially because, you’ll weave in more description as the story or narrative builds.

We give more clues to the reader through:
1)    Describing the environment around a character’s occupation and living situation,
2)    Noting the way people react to him or her,
3)    Plus, everyone has an inner layer of history; the details we readily see are clues to a person’s life. Consider which outward signs history might create, and describe those clues as you build aspects of your character’s life.


Book suggestions for writers:
Keys To Great Writing, Revised and Expanded, by Stephen Wilbers
Word Painting, by Rebecca McClanahan

Earlier Post links in this series—Descriptive Writing for Fiction and Non-Fiction:
Write it with Senses and POV Tips: https://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/07/senses-pov-tips-descriptive-writing.html
Tips for Figurative Speech: https://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/08/tips-for-figurative-speech.html 
 
Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her writer’s website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/ 
Available on Amazon --- Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love
https://www.amazon.com/author/deborahlynstanley
Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour 

 

 

 


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Tips for Figurative Speech

 

 

Tips for Figurative Speech for Descriptive Writing


We strengthen our writing by using descriptive details that develop the topic; and
enhance with metaphors, similes, and comparisons, known as figures of speech. Today, let’s name figures of speech and consider how to use them in our writing.

We define a figure of speech as any intentional deviation from a literal statement or from common usage that emphasizes, clarifies, or embellishes. Poets use figurative language somewhat naturally. An associate of mine finds more insight into connections in poetry than I do.

What can we do to expand our repertoire to incorporate figures of speech in our writing if it does not come easy? Let’s review a few and get ideas popping.

Metaphors, similes, hyperbole, paradox, analogy, allegory, and symbols are a sampling, and are defined by Merriam-Webster’s below, with added comments. Strunk and White caution writers to use figures of speech sparingly, and always give the reader a chance to recognize comparisons before moving on to another.

Metaphors: a figure of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is used in place of another, suggesting a likeness between them. It’s an imaginative transfer from one thing carried over to another. It’s an intuitive perception of similarity from items that are not.

Similes: a figure of speech comparing two unlike things, often introduced by like or as. It not only makes a definite comparison but explains it with simplicity.

Hyperbole: is an extravagant exaggeration, stating an outlandish comparison.

Paradox: is a statement that seems contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. It can suggest complex emotion and provides mystery to our writing. It is the presentation of unlike ideas, which invites the reader to solve a puzzle.

Analogy: is a resemblance in some particulars between things otherwise unalike, a comparison based on such resemblance. Using analogies helps to clarify or reinforce our meaning, particularly for complex abstract or technical ideas.

Allegory: is the expression by means of symbolic fictional figures and actions of truths or generalizations, about human existence in a story or art. It’s metaphorical in each element of person, place, thing or idea.

Symbols: are things that stand for or suggest something else because of relationship, association, convention or accidental resemblance. Not a meaning or a moral, but points to it. A symbol can be a symbolic gesture.

The challenge is the avoidance of sounding contrived.
Try figurative parts of speech and see what might work for you.

Added recommendation:
Keys To Great Writing, Revised and Expanded, by Stephen Wilbers

Earlier Post links in this series—Descriptive Writing for Fiction and Non-Fiction:
Make it with Specificity:  https://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/04/decriptive-writing-with-specificity.html
Write it with Research II:  https://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/06/more-research-tips.html
Write it with Senses and POV Tips: https://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/07/senses-pov-tips-descriptive-writing.html

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her writer’s website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/  
Visit her caregiver’s website and read the Mom & Me memoir at: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/
Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour

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Senses & POV Tips - Descriptive Writing


   
 

Senses & POV Tips for Descriptive Writing  By Deborah Lyn Stanley

We strengthen our writing by using descriptive details that develop the topic.
Today let’s talk more about using sense words and choosing the point-of-view.


Use description for fresh, active and believable prose. Write what you see, smell, taste, hear or touch, and include details:
•We write to help the reader see what we see.
•We augment sight with smell to build the vision. Smell has the longest memory of all the senses. English Leather cologne takes me back to dating years with my husband—home-baked bread and chocolate chip cookies too!
•Writers often describe smells in terms of other smells, either good or bad.
•We commonly describe taste relative to memorable occasions by naming the food.
Besides naming the taste or dish, writers often describe taste as sweet, sour, salty or bitter.

What if we use descriptive words for smell and taste that are outside common usage? What if color and shape are borrowed from sight descriptions to indicate a smell or a taste?  Ex.: “squat, plumpy, fluted” “Aroma of lemon blossom flavors my tea.”  “Cloves sting my blistered lips.” “I’m thirsty for sleep.”
Explore outside-the-box-descriptions—and share what you come up with.

•Touch is intimate because to touch something or someone, we must be close. It requires trust.
•Sound often plays a significant role in the writing process. It enhances mood: anywhere from tranquil to suspenseful. Prose can be musical in itself with rhythms, diction, and tone, or mechanical noise, all for the purpose of leading the reader deeper into the story.

The Basics of the three main Point-of-View Methods:
• In a first-person point-of-view, the story perspective is from “I or we”. The writing is filtered through the storyteller’s awareness, with a narrow field of vision from a single point. This can help unify your story by choosing which details to include in each scene. In addition, it helps you organize the details into the sequence the teller notices each detail. First-person POV requires the narrator to be present in every scene or rely on secondary information to relate the feelings or thinking of the character.

•Second-person point-of-view narration is usually you as the main character, placing you in the events of the story.

•Third-person point-of-view narration is an objective report of the story via outward signs and description. This point-of-view freely relates any external and visible information or events happening to anyone, anywhere. It uses multiple camera views, capturing unlimited pictures for the reader. The narrator is free to discuss the past, providing accounts of people, places, or things. But, cannot reveal what anyone in the story thinks or feels.

Enhance your writing—incorporate metaphors, similes, and comparisons.

Earlier Post links in this series—Descriptive Writing for Fiction and Non-Fiction:
Make it with Specificity:  https://www.writersonthemove.com/search?q=make+it+with+specificity
Write it with Research I:  http://www.writersonthemove.com/2020/05/write-it-with-research.html

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. 

Visit her writer’s website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   

Visit her caregiver’s website and read the Mom & Me memoir at: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/

Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour

 

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Book Review: Write Smart Write Happy



Cheryl St. John is the author of Write Smart Write Happy, How to Become a More Productive, Resilient, and Successful Writer


Cheryl St. John’s book title intrigued me. And, when my accountability partner recommended it, I bought it—sure glad I did. As an award-winning published author of over fifty novels, Cheryl is qualified to coach writers as she shares her lessons-learned throughout the book. Her advice is compassionate, straightforward and encouraging. Write Smart Write Happy, has had a significant influence on my outlook as a writer. I kept a notebook to record the volume of important points that stood out to me in each chapter.

I particularly enjoyed fostering a positive view for my writing journey, creating a routine, counting all the good things, and defining action steps to improve self-confidence.

The Goal of the book is to impress writers with the importance of creating a productive writing practice that survives the vulnerability encased within writing. This book addresses career-planning goals, motivation, overcoming hurdles, holding onto who you are, conquering fear and managing priorities.

I whole-heartedly recommend this book. It is candid, it’s comprehensive, and it will motivate you no matter where you are in the writers' journey.

Thank you Cheryl St. John much appreciated!

I am working on my next post series. What writing craft topic would be most useful to you?  i.e. Crafting Essays, Time Management, Motivation. Please add your comment below.  



Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. 

Visit her writer’s website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Check out her caregiver’s website at: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/ 
and a book for caregivers at: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/momandme/  
Facebook: Deborah Lyn Stanley, Writer    https://www.facebook.com/deborahlynwriter/?modal=admin_todo_tour

Tips for Creating Subplots in Middle Grade Novels

by Suzanne Lieurance   If you’re writing a middle grade novel, you want to include at least one or two subplots. Subplots in fiction are sec...