Showing posts with label magazine publication. Show all posts
Showing posts with label magazine publication. Show all posts

Grow Contract Awareness for Magazine Work

 

Grow Contract Awareness for Magazine Work by Deborah Lyn Stanley

As we grow writing skills and expertise through magazine submittals for publication, we must be contract wise.

Magazine work is a great way to earn money and to promote various topics to gage readership response. The online world has made it possible for the rapid growth of digital magazine publications. So, be sure to research the magazines that catch your interest for the right fit for you and your audience. Plus, a topic focused specialty is attractive to a publisher.

Once you land a deal with a publisher, a contract will follow. If for some reason, no contract is sent to you, create your own. Don’t work without a contract describing all conditions.

Contracts cover all pertinent information and must be considered point by point. Take it slow and break it down item by item. Be thoroughly aware of the publisher’s expectations and your commitments. For example, the delivery date must be doable.

The Contract’s main and subsections include:
1.    Payment method and rate
       a.    Payment upon acceptance or on publication, but typically between 30-90 days
2.    Rights and responsibilities
       a.    First North American Serial Rights,
             1.    Provides the publisher exclusive rights to be the first to publish your article. Note the time   period for this exclusivity, commonly 90 days.
       b.    One Time Rights,
              1.    Gives the publisher the right to publish your article one time
       c.    Second Serial Rights or Reprint Rights,
              1.    Grants the publisher a nonexclusive right to publish, one time, a piece already published somewhere else.
       d.    All Rights
             1.    You are selling all the rights to your article to the publisher—this takes careful consideration. What if you want to publish the article somewhere else? And, what if they rework the piece so much that it’s not yours any longer?
       e.    Electronic Rights
             1.    This means all forms of electronic media: CE’s, DVD’s, games, apps, etc.
3.    Deadlines, format for delivery, and Word count
4.    Magazines often have their preferred contract format; However, I have included two links that might help you get acquainted with a couple.

Basics Tip: An essay is all about the writer; whereas, an article is all about the reader. An essay is an analytical or interpretative composition, and an article is informational non-fiction prose.


Helpful Resources:
Writing for Magazine - Is It the Perfect Job for You?  By Suzanne Lieurance
https://www.writersonthemove.com/2014/02/writing-for-magazines-is-it-perfect-job.html

Contributor’s Agreement Sample  —    http://publishlawyer.com/contrib.pdf 

Memorandum Agreement Sample —   https://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LIGHTSPEED-Original-Contract-Short-Story.pdf   

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/

Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love is available:
https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Lyn-Stanley/
& https://books2read.com/b/valuestories


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Grow Your Skills with Magazine Publication

Grow Your Skills with Magazine Publication by Deborah Lyn Stanley

Grow your writing skill and expertise with Magazine Publication. It is a great way to monetize your writing and to promote various topics for readership response.

The good news is the online world has made it possible for the rapid growth of digital magazine publications. Be sure to research the magazines that catch your interest, for the right fit for you and your audience. Also, specializing in a particular genre is attractive to a magazine publisher.

The list of Genres/Categories for magazine writing is extensive but here are a few for your consideration:
•    Consumer topics
•    Trends
•    Local news, highlighting merchants or events
•    Interviews with notable people in a field or industry
•    True crime
•    Sports
•    Parenting
•    Trade Journals
•    Health & Safety, Alternative Health
•    Aging, Seniors
•    Retirement
•    Travel
•    Humor
•    How-To
•    Arts & Crafts
•    Food & Cooking
•    Personal Essays
•    Writing to Inspire
•    Business to Business
•    Seasonal and Holiday pieces
Tip: An essay is all about the writer; whereas, an article is all about the reader. An essay is an analytical or interpretative composition, and an article is informational non-fiction prose.


Uncovering New Topic Ideas:
•    Do you have a notable vacation spot in your area?
•    Do you like to Travel?
•    Do you have specific or specialized knowledge for a certain topic? Write about it.
•    Are you into car repair and maintenance? Write tips and money-saving ideas.
•    Start a clipping file of articles, columns, newspaper/journalistic reports that have captured your attention, interest, or imagination.

Helpful questions to evaluate each selection you research:
•    Use a Marketing Guide to select the periodicals you want to study.
•    Would you be proud to promote the magazine and your writing included there?
•    What is the magazine’s specialty? Will your work fit?
•    How long is its typical article—300-500 words and an occasional 1,000-word piece?
•    Do the articles include the advice from experts? Is it an interview?
     What are the expert’s qualifications? How many quotes are included?
•    Which magazine would increase your byline influence?
•    Would the periodical send readers to your website or blog for more?
•    Does the magazine have a good reputation?
•    What is its readership base?
•    Would you consider working with a smaller magazine?
•    Does the magazine offer online and print subscription? Where would your work run—online and print?
•    Check your market guidebook and the magazine’s website for detailed submittal requirements.
•    Are the submittal requirements doable for you? Make detailed notes of the submittal process conditions missing no requirement, as the process varies from magazine to magazine. Don’t let a missed detail in your submittal be grounds for dismissal of your piece.
•    Does the magazine accept simultaneous submittals?
•    Consistently double check found information to confirm it as a credible resource.
•    Disclose your sources of information.
•    Use your personal experience, & be your own expert!

The “Writer’s Market” is an excellent resource to find the magazine that fits for your piece or interest.
Note:
•    Contact information for departments for freelancers
•    What they are looking for
•    Conditions for query letters
•    Word count requirements
•    Pay rate
•    Tips for landing an assignment.


Links of Interest
• 21 Magazines for freelance writing jobs:
https://makealivingwriting.com/write-for-magazines/

• Robert Lee Brewer: Writing Submissions for Magazines: How to Submit Writing to a Magazine
https://www.writersdigest.com/publishing-insights/writing-submissions-for-magazines-how-to-submit-writing-to-a-magazine

 

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/

Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love is available:
https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Lyn-Stanley/
& https://books2read.com/b/valuestories

 

Share on LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/

And more via the icon bar below:


Tips for Online Magazine Pub series #10



Last time we talked about tips for selling essays to magazines, including personal essays. (1.25.2019) If you are interested in more about personal essay writing, “Crafting the Personal Essay” by Dinty W. Moore might be one for your to-read stack. It is in mine.

Publishing in magazines, in print and online, is a great way to connect with your audience and grow your platform. In each article, be sure to include a short bio with your byline.

Today let’s talk about publishing online.
Opportunities for publishing online include:
•    Magazines in print with an online division have similar submittal requirements for both
•    Online only magazines often publish multiple times a month and may pay less
•    Blogs: Companies use blog post writers as part of their marketing strategy -- Best format = Tip lists or “listicles” are often key formats
•    Blogging entities open to contributing authors allow your byline and media links as your remuneration

Research the magazines and blogs that grab your interest, and choose with whom you want to associate, and then be willing to start without pay swapped for a byline and links to your website.

It takes time to find the right fit for publishing your topics and areas of importance. You might find a match in the categories I’ve noted above.

Useful Links:
The Write Life freelancing hints and leads:
https://thewritelife.com/category/freelancing/
https://thewritelife.com/find-freelance-writing-jobs/

Upwork matches the freelancer with those posting jobs:
https://www.upwork.com/i/how-it-works/freelancer/

Content Marketing - quality content always works:
https://www.copyblogger.com/



Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .

Write clear & concise, personable yet professional.
Know your reader.



Tips for Selling Your Essay - Magazine Pub series #9


Tips for Selling Essays to Magazines  ----   Should I submit a pitch or a draft?

The question of sending a full draft or a pitch varies from magazine to magazine. Follow your selected magazine’s guidelines and requirements for submittal, if possible.

Here are points of reference:
•    Literary journals customarily require full drafts for submittal.
•    If you don’t have clips of published essays, a good rule of thumb is to submit essays on spec, meaning in full draft form.
•    When your essay is difficult to convey in a pitch, send a full draft.
•    On a tight schedule? Get your pitch out there and buy yourself some time to draft it.
•    Some editors prefer to receive a pitch. Search the magazine’s website or place a call for the info.
•    If your essay topic is relative to breaking news, your best choice may be to pitch your idea.
•    When you’ve worked with an editor previously, a pitch may be all that’s needed to assign the essay.
•    Should your essay require in depth research and include interviews, pitching the idea may be best.

To grab your reader, compose the essay as you would a story with one theme, a beginning, middle, and end. Include dialogue, setting, and engaging description. 

You may choose to write a personal essay sharing a part of your life with others. Personal Essays connect and communicate to the reader they are not alone. As I worked through an essay about being emotionally sidelined during childhood I knew I was not alone and wanted encourage others with similar experiences. Writing a personal essay in first-person narrative is customary. 

Personal essays are just that: personal. You are telling true-life experiences that may also lead to discussing a subject about which you are passionate. These essays are public—it’s important to consider the subjects you would rather keep private for your journal alone.

** Last time we talked about getting a handle on our Copyrights. I’ve added a couple links you may find useful.
http://library.findlaw.com/1999/Jan/1/241476.html
http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm
http://www.bitlaw.com/copyright/index.html 

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .

Write clear & concise, personable yet professional.
Know your reader.
Use quotes & antidotes.

Write for Magazine Publication - series #8


Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and test the interest level of your topic. This series has offered tips for magazine publishing. (Topic archive below)

Essays are all about the writer; articles are all about the reader. An essay is an opinion piece. An article is non-fiction text.

Today, we’ll talk about Letter of Agreements and Copyright.

Letter of Agreement:

An informal outline of all the terms you agree to is a Letter of Agreement (LOA). It is in the format of a letter with signature lines at the bottom. The agreement covers the following and acts to clarity the agreement:

1.      Annotates the services provided, and those not provided

a.       High level editing with “track changes” using Word

2.     The due date for the publishers receipt of your article or essay

a.       Delivery as a Word.doc with “track changes” active

3.     The delivery terms detailing the manner in which the publisher wants to receive and edit your piece:

a.       Format, electronic delivery or otherwise

b.      Style choices determined by AP Style Guide and client’s house style

c.       Editing shall preserve the author’s tone and style

4.      Payment rate per word or flat fee

5.      Payment terms (check/PayPal etc.)

This link may be helpful:

https://www.thebalancesmb.com/sample-contract-a-letter-of-agreement-1360549

Copyright:

A Copyright is the exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell or distribute a piece of writing.

The best thing I can offer you are links to the technical aspects of the Copyright Law of the United States.  

Helpful Links for Copyrights:

https://www.copyright.gov/title17/

https://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/index.html

https://www.copyright.gov/title37/

This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips (posted 6.25.18), standard templates for essay and article pieces (7.25.18), query letters (informal known to editor 8.25.18) and (formal query tips 9.25.18), guidelines for submission (posted 10.25.18), and contracts (posted 11.25.2018), and LOA & copyright tips (posted 12.25.2018).

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .

Write your best, in your voice, your way!

Write for Magazine Publication - series #7



Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and test your topic for readership interest. This series has offered tips for magazine publishing. (Topic archive below)

Essays are all about the writer; articles are all about the reader. An essay is an opinion piece. An article is non-fiction text.

Today, we’ll talk about a long form magazine agreement, which may be used when the editor is interested in hiring you to write an article or essay.

Magazine Contract:
Contracts cover all pertinent information, and must be considered point by point. Take it slow and break it down item by item to know the conditions you are committed to deliver.
The main sections and subsections are:

1.       Payment method and rate
a.       Payment upon acceptance or on publication, but typically between 30-90 days
2.       Rights and responsibilities
a.       First North American Serial Rights,
1.        Provides the publisher exclusive rights to be the first to publish your article. Note the time period for this exclusivity, commonly 90 days.
b.      One Time Rights,
1.        Gives the publisher the right to publish your article one time
c.       Second Serial Rights or Reprint Rights,
1.        Grants the publisher a nonexclusive right to publish, one time, a piece already published somewhere else.
d.      All Rights
1.        You are selling all the rights to your article to the publisher—this takes careful consideration. What if you want to publish the article somewhere else? And, what if they rework the piece so much that it’s not yours any longer?
e.       Electronic Rights
1.        This means all forms of electronic media: CE’s, DVD’s, games, apps, etc.
3.       Deadlines and format for delivery, and
4.      Word count

These links may be helpful to you:
Contributor’s Agreement Sample     http://publishlawyer.com/contrib.pdf

Kerrie Flanagan’s new book is an informative resource:
“Writer’s Digest Guide to Magazine Article Writing”  by Kerrie Flanagan

This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips (posted 6.25.18), standard templates for essay and article pieces (7.25.18), query letters (informal known to editor 8.25.18) and (formal query tips 9.25.18), guidelines for submission (posted 10.25.18), and contracts (posted 11.25.2018), LOA & copyright tips.

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .  

Write clear & concise, personable yet professional. 
Know your reader. 
Use quotes & antidotes.

Write for Magazine Publication -- series #6


Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and test your topic for readership interest. This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing. (See topic archive below)

Essays are all about the writer, but articles are all about the reader. An essay is an opinion piece: an analytical or interpretative work with a limited point of view. An article is non-fiction text presenting information to the reader.

Today, let’s talk about guidelines for submitting your writing for publication review.
Submittal guidelines tell you what you need to know to have your piece considered by the magazine of your interest. The best chance for success involves reading the guidelines point by point and following them precisely as you prepare your submittal package. Magazine guidelines are frequently found on their website under About Us, or Contact Us, at the bottom of the home page.

In addition, the “Writer’s Market” is an excellent resource to find the magazine that fits for your piece or interest. Note:
•    Contact information for departments for freelancers,
•    What they are looking for,
•    Conditions for query letters,
•    Word count requirements,
•    Pay rate, and
•    Tips for landing an assignment.

Resources for online market information include: 
•    “All Freelance Writing”
•    “Funds for Writers”
•    “Freelance Writing” e-zine: https://www.freelancewriting.com/

Kerrie Flanagan’s book is an informative resource as well as her article on WOW:
“Writer’s Digest Guide to Magazine Article Writing”  by Kerrie Flanagan
“5 Things You Need to Know to Write for Magazines”  http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/42-FE2-WriteforMagazines.html

This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips (posted 6.25.18), standard templates for essay and article pieces (7.25.18), query letters (informal known to editor 8.25.18) and (formal query tips 9.25.18), guidelines for submission (posted 10.25.18), and contract & copyright tips.

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .  

Write clear & concise, personable yet professional. 

Know your reader. 
Use quotes & antidotes often.

Write for Magazine Publication #5



Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and test your topic for readership interest. This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips (posted 6.25.18), standard templates for essay and article pieces (7.25.18), query letters (informal known to editor 8.25.18) and (formal query tips 9.25.18), formatting for submission, and copyright definitions.

Essays are all about the writer, but articles are all about the reader. An essay is an opinion piece: an analytical or interpretative work with a limited point of view. However, an article is non-fiction text presenting information to the reader.

In prep for writing our query letter, be sure to revisit your research of the particular magazine you want to pitch.  To gauge how you approach the magazine and determine their audience, you’ve:
1.    Thoroughly read a few copies of the magazine, including advertisements
2.    Found the editor to address your query in the masthead.
3.    Copied the submittal requirements and reviewed them point by point.
4.    Visit and read the magazine’s website.
5.    Read the market listing in Writer’s Market

Today, let’s talk about a formal query written to an agent or editor new to you. 

Do Tips:
•    Our goal is to present a query letter in a professional manner that is clear and concise. It should be one single spaced page with block paragraph format.
•    Use customary typeface and font: Times New Roman, 10 or 12 point, and one-inch margins.
•    Demonstrate you are knowledgeable about the specific magazine you are contacting.
•    Query letters are a call to action, so be specific from the first line of your letter, thus honoring the editors time.
•    Include some biographical information to show your personality and voice, but don’t go overboard.
•    Always follow the submission guidelines specific to the magazine you are querying.
•    Thank the editor for considering your query and always include your contact information (name, address, phone number, email address and website if you have one).
•    Wait the noted response time before contacting an editor to follow up on your query. (refer to the submittal guidelines)

Not for the Query Letter Tips:
•    Discuss pay rates
•    Mention that your work is copyrighted
•    Don’t hint you are willing to rewrite the piece

Kerrie Flanagan’s new book and Informative Links:
5 Things You Need to Know to Write for Magazines:   http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/42-FE2-WriteforMagazines.html   Know the Reader, Know the Magazine, Know the Style, Know the Submission Guidelines, Know How to Write an Effective Query Letter.
and her new book --  “Writer’s Digest Guide to Magazine Article Writing”  by Kerrie Flanagan

http://www.writersmarket.com/assets/pdf/Query_Letter_Clinic.pdf     *includes good and bad letter samples

 https://www.writersdigestshop.com/query-letter


Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn : My Writer's Life

Write clear & concise, personable yet professional.
Know your reader.
Use quotes & antidotes.

Don’t Depend 100% on Your Publisher

By Terry Whalin (@terrywhalin) In 2007, America’s Publicist Rick Frishman invited me to participate on the faculty of MegaBook Marketing Uni...