Showing posts with label magazine guidelines. Show all posts
Showing posts with label magazine guidelines. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 13, 2022

Grow Your Skills with Magazine Publication

Grow Your Skills with Magazine Publication by Deborah Lyn Stanley

Grow your writing skill and expertise with Magazine Publication. It is a great way to monetize your writing and to promote various topics for readership response.

The good news is the online world has made it possible for the rapid growth of digital magazine publications. Be sure to research the magazines that catch your interest, for the right fit for you and your audience. Also, specializing in a particular genre is attractive to a magazine publisher.

The list of Genres/Categories for magazine writing is extensive but here are a few for your consideration:
•    Consumer topics
•    Trends
•    Local news, highlighting merchants or events
•    Interviews with notable people in a field or industry
•    True crime
•    Sports
•    Parenting
•    Trade Journals
•    Health & Safety, Alternative Health
•    Aging, Seniors
•    Retirement
•    Travel
•    Humor
•    How-To
•    Arts & Crafts
•    Food & Cooking
•    Personal Essays
•    Writing to Inspire
•    Business to Business
•    Seasonal and Holiday pieces
Tip: An essay is all about the writer; whereas, an article is all about the reader. An essay is an analytical or interpretative composition, and an article is informational non-fiction prose.


Uncovering New Topic Ideas:
•    Do you have a notable vacation spot in your area?
•    Do you like to Travel?
•    Do you have specific or specialized knowledge for a certain topic? Write about it.
•    Are you into car repair and maintenance? Write tips and money-saving ideas.
•    Start a clipping file of articles, columns, newspaper/journalistic reports that have captured your attention, interest, or imagination.

Helpful questions to evaluate each selection you research:
•    Use a Marketing Guide to select the periodicals you want to study.
•    Would you be proud to promote the magazine and your writing included there?
•    What is the magazine’s specialty? Will your work fit?
•    How long is its typical article—300-500 words and an occasional 1,000-word piece?
•    Do the articles include the advice from experts? Is it an interview?
     What are the expert’s qualifications? How many quotes are included?
•    Which magazine would increase your byline influence?
•    Would the periodical send readers to your website or blog for more?
•    Does the magazine have a good reputation?
•    What is its readership base?
•    Would you consider working with a smaller magazine?
•    Does the magazine offer online and print subscription? Where would your work run—online and print?
•    Check your market guidebook and the magazine’s website for detailed submittal requirements.
•    Are the submittal requirements doable for you? Make detailed notes of the submittal process conditions missing no requirement, as the process varies from magazine to magazine. Don’t let a missed detail in your submittal be grounds for dismissal of your piece.
•    Does the magazine accept simultaneous submittals?
•    Consistently double check found information to confirm it as a credible resource.
•    Disclose your sources of information.
•    Use your personal experience, & be your own expert!

The “Writer’s Market” is an excellent resource to find the magazine that fits for your piece or interest.
Note:
•    Contact information for departments for freelancers
•    What they are looking for
•    Conditions for query letters
•    Word count requirements
•    Pay rate
•    Tips for landing an assignment.


Links of Interest
• 21 Magazines for freelance writing jobs:
https://makealivingwriting.com/write-for-magazines/

• Robert Lee Brewer: Writing Submissions for Magazines: How to Submit Writing to a Magazine
https://www.writersdigest.com/publishing-insights/writing-submissions-for-magazines-how-to-submit-writing-to-a-magazine

 

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her My Writer’s Life website at: https://deborahlynwriter.com/   
Visit her caregiver’s website: https://deborahlyncaregiver.com/

Mom & Me: A Story of Dementia and the Power of God’s Love is available:
https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Lyn-Stanley/
& https://books2read.com/b/valuestories

 

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Thursday, October 25, 2018

Write for Magazine Publication -- series #6


Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and test your topic for readership interest. This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing. (See topic archive below)

Essays are all about the writer, but articles are all about the reader. An essay is an opinion piece: an analytical or interpretative work with a limited point of view. An article is non-fiction text presenting information to the reader.

Today, let’s talk about guidelines for submitting your writing for publication review.
Submittal guidelines tell you what you need to know to have your piece considered by the magazine of your interest. The best chance for success involves reading the guidelines point by point and following them precisely as you prepare your submittal package. Magazine guidelines are frequently found on their website under About Us, or Contact Us, at the bottom of the home page.

In addition, the “Writer’s Market” is an excellent resource to find the magazine that fits for your piece or interest. Note:
•    Contact information for departments for freelancers,
•    What they are looking for,
•    Conditions for query letters,
•    Word count requirements,
•    Pay rate, and
•    Tips for landing an assignment.

Resources for online market information include: 
•    “All Freelance Writing”
•    “Funds for Writers”
•    “Freelance Writing” e-zine: https://www.freelancewriting.com/

Kerrie Flanagan’s book is an informative resource as well as her article on WOW:
“Writer’s Digest Guide to Magazine Article Writing”  by Kerrie Flanagan
“5 Things You Need to Know to Write for Magazines”  http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/42-FE2-WriteforMagazines.html

This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips (posted 6.25.18), standard templates for essay and article pieces (7.25.18), query letters (informal known to editor 8.25.18) and (formal query tips 9.25.18), guidelines for submission (posted 10.25.18), and contract & copyright tips.

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .  

Write clear & concise, personable yet professional. 

Know your reader. 
Use quotes & antidotes often.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Write for Magazine Publication - #3



 

Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and test topic marketability.
Let’s talk about Structure today. 

This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips (posted 6.25.18), standard templates for essay and article pieces (7.25.18), query letters, formatting for submittal, and copyright definitions.

What’s the difference between an essay and an article?
  • The essay is all about the writer, but an article is all about the reader.
  • An essay is an opinion piece: an analytical or interpretative composition with a limited point of view.
  • An article is non-fiction prose that is information or knowledge based.
Templates for composing an Article or an Essay:
The recommended template for Articles follows:
  • The opening paragraph, is the introduction, and should be to the point and tightly written.
  • Transition – getting into the subject
  • Steps – describe the process in steps
  • Tips – offer tips for success
  • Conclusion

The standard Essay template follows:
  • Introduction Paragraph – Capture interest, move from the general to the specific and write a thesis statement as the final sentence of this paragraph.
  • Body of the Essay – Three Supporting Paragraphs
  • Each paragraph should begin with a topic sentence, and then present evidence to support your ideas, anticipate push back – refute it, and finish the paragraph with a smooth transition to the next supporting point.
  • Conclusion – One Paragraph
    • Restate your thesis in a similar way
    • Summarize your first, second, and third supporting points
    • Confirm the validity of your ideas
    • End the conclusion with a call-to-action or an emotional appeal

Resources of interest:
For Articles -- Eva Shaw’s The Successful Writer’s Guide to Publishing Magazine Articles--Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Successful-Writers-Publishing-Magazine-Articles/

http://www.write.com/2013/12/26/structure-and-flow-writing-a-great-article/
https://www.tru.ca/__shared/assets/Critical_Analysis_Template30565.pdf

For Essays:
https://essayservice.com/blog/essay-outline/#structure

https://www.template.net/business/outline-templates/sample-essay-outline/

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts. Visit her web-blog:
Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .
“Write your best, in your voice, your way!

Monday, June 25, 2018

Write for Magazine Publication - #2

Writing for Magazine Publication is a great way to monetize your writing and to test topic marketability. This is the second in a series of posts investigating the components of writing essays and articles for magazines. Your work could be in print or online in just a few months.

This series offers tips and ideas for magazine publishing: a list of genres or categories and where we find ideas (posted 5.25.18), research tips, standard templates for essay and article pieces, query letters, formatting for submittal, and copyright definitions.

What’s the difference between an essay and an article? The essay is all about the writer. An article is all about the reader. An essay is an analytical or interpretative composition while an article is informational non-fiction prose.

Today, let’s talk about researching to find the best magazine for your articles—
Use these questions to evaluate the best path:

•    Use a Marketing Guide to select the periodicals you want to study.

•    Would you be proud to promote the magazine and your writing included there?

•    What is the magazine’s specialty? Will your work fit?

•    How long is its typical article—300-500 words and an occasional 1,000-word piece?

•    Do the articles include the advice from experts? Is it an interview? What are the expert’s qualifications? How many quotes are included?

•    Which magazine would increase your byline influence?

•    Would the periodical send readers to your website or blog for more?

•    Does the magazine have a good reputation?

•    What is its readership base?

•    Where is the periodical’s coverage; local, national or international?

•    Would you consider working with a smaller magazine?

•    Does the magazine offer online and print subscription? Where would your work run—online and print or just one?

•    Check your market guidebook and the magazine’s website for detailed submittal requirements
.
•    Are the submittal requirements doable for you? Make detailed notes of the submittal process conditions missing no requirement, remembering the process varies from magazine to magazine. Don’t let a missed detail in your submittal be grounds for dismissal of your piece.

•    Does the magazine accept simultaneous submittals?

•    Avoid Wikipedia except for general information. Consistently double check the information to confirm it as a credible resource.

•    Use data from governmental sources or from well-known organizations.

•    Disclose your sources of information.

•    Use your personal experience, be your own expert!

Please share your tips in ‘comments’ below.

Deborah Lyn Stanley is an author of Creative Non-Fiction. She writes articles, essays and stories. She is passionate about caring for the mentally impaired through creative arts.
Visit her web-blog: Deborah Lyn Stanley : MyWriter's Life .
“Write your best, in your voice, your way!

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Submit to Fiction Magazines with Themes

I love magazines with themes or prompts, because they expose the many, many ways our minds work differently to produce so many stories from one kernel of an idea.

For all you fiction writers out there, if you're having writer's block or if you want to challenge yourself to write something you normally wouldn't, try writing for one of the magazines or e-zines below. 

Paying Markets ($10-$50)

THEMA Literary Journal.  Each issue is based closely around a specific theme.  All genres.  Reprints accepted.  Current and upcoming themes:  "Was that today?" and "We thought he'd never leave."  Submission guidelines

The First Line Literary Magazine.  Each story must start with the same sentence.  All genres.  Current and upcoming first lines:  "Fifty miles west of Bloomington lies Hillsboro, a monument to middle-class malaise," and "We went as far as the car would take us."  Submission Guidelines.

Pantheon.  As the name suggests, this magazine's issues center around various gods and goddesses.  All genres welcome.  Reprints accepted, but unpaid. Current themes:  "Ares" and "Gaia."  Submission Guidelines.

Infective Ink.  All genres.  Current and upcoming themes:  "The future of dating," "Great friendships."  Submission Guidelines.

On the Premises.  This is run like a contest, but with no fee.  Third to first prizes $100-$180.  Honorable mentions, $40.  All genres.  Current Contest:  "Decisions, Decisions."  Submission Guidelines.

Long Count Press. E-book anthologies of fantasy fiction.  Currently closed to submissions, but check in the future.  Last theme:  "Mesoamerican Fantasy."  Submission Guidelines.

Timeless Tales.  Retold fairy tales.  Next theme:  "Twelve Dancing Princesses."  Reprints accepted.  Submission Guidelines.

Subterrain.  A Canadian magazine that requires paper submissions (and an SASE with an IRC).  Upcoming themes:  "Pulp Fiction," and "Meat."  Submission Guidelines.

Semi-Pro and Pro Markets

Crossed Genres.  Science fiction or fantasy only.  Current and upcoming themes:  "Typical" and "Robots, Androids, and Cyborgs."  5 cents/word.  Submission Guidelines.

Unlikely Story.  Their two main themes are "entomology" (bugs) and "cryptography" (codes and ciphers).  They also have other theme issues, like "cartography" (maps).  All genres.   5 cents/word.  Reprints accepted at a lower rate.  Submission Guidelines.

Crab Orchard Review.  Literary.  One yearly theme (submissions accepted October).  This year's theme:  "Stories that covers any of the ways our world and ourselves have changed due to the advancements, setbacks, tragedies, and triumphs of the last twenty years, 1995-2015."  $100 minimum.  Submission Guidelines.

Penumbra.  Speculative fiction only.  Upcoming themes:  "Pain" and "Lewis Carroll."  5 cents/word.  Submission Guidelines.

Cobblestone Publishing's non-fiction magazines for kids 9-14 accept 800-words stories based on specific themes.  Your choices:  Calliope (world history), Cobblestone (American history), Dig (archeology), Faces (world culture and geography), and Odyssey (science).  Check the guidelines for query dates and themes.  Very good rates.  Submission Guidelines (choose the individual magazine you're interested in).

Guidelines

Fiction magazines these days come and go, so be sure to verify the details before submitting.  And, as always, read the submission guidelines, word count requirements, and theme information very closely.  Some are so specific you'll pretty much have to write a story with the magazine in mind.  Others are looser, so you can match up stories you've already written. 

Whatever you do, have fun and keep writing.



Melinda Brasher's first fiction sale was in THEMA, one of the magazines above.  She has other stories published in various magazines, including On the Premises.  She also loves to travel and is currently writing a budget traveler's guide to cruising Alaska.

Friday, October 14, 2011

5 Tips for Researching the Children's Magazine Market




5 TIPS FOR RESEARCHING THE CHILDREN’S MAGAZINE MARKET

by Donna M. McDine

A writer comes up with what he feels is the perfect storyline for an engaging short story and puts it down on paper. The manuscript is edited and revised several times and the writer is thrilled with the outcome. The next step is to submit the manuscript to their critique group. The feedback includes suggestions and ideas to tighten up the story further. One member asks: Where are you going to submit? Your fingers linger over your keyboard, your mind goes blank. Ugh! You’ve missed a critical step; research of appropriate markets. You respond: “I’ll get back to you on that.” Before a writer even develops a storyline into a short story or article, follow these five crucial steps in researching children’s stories market potential:

1. RESEARCH THE MARKET: Obtain the latest issue of Magazine Markets for Children’s Writers’, published by Writer’s Institute Publications, http://www.writersbookstore.com/, 1-800-443-6078. This resource book is the most comprehensive directory of the children’s writers market. Beyond the scope of the synopsis of each market this valuable book contains information on how-to research the market; preparing manuscript packets; preparing query and cover letters; and outlines.

2. WRITERS’ GUIDELINES: It is essential for a writer to take the time to attain the most recent writers’ guidelines for a particular publication. It is imperative that a writer reads and follows what the editor requests of submissions. You can obtain many writers’ guidelines through their website or write a letter to the publication requesting a copy of their writers’ guidelines. Be sure to include a self addressed stamped envelope (SASE). If a writer can’t follow the specific guidelines the chance of publication is zero.

3. SAMPLE ISSUES: Beyond reading and studying a particular publications outline in the Magazine Markets for Children’s Writers’, it is equally vital that a writer study past issues at the library or request a sample issue from the publisher. If writing to the publication for writers’ guidelines then would be a good time to request a sample issue. The cost is usually indicated within the outline in the “Magazine Markets for Children’s Writers’. Analysis of past issues will give the writer insight towards subject matter, readership levels, and particular slants of the articles and stories.

4. THEME LISTS: Make sure to find out if a magazine you are interested in submitting to works off a theme list. This is another important point to take into consideration. If you are going to send in an article on dogs for their June issue and the issue is themed around elephants, chances are your manuscript will be returned. Some times it may seem that theme lists would hinder the writer, but you’d be surprised how many ideas cram into a writers’ creative mind when provided with a theme list.

5. HOW MANY PUBLICATIONS: Research at least three possible markets for the manuscript. Keep all notes together. When a response is received from the first publication and if it is a rejection you can easily review the next publication on the list, rather than researching again. Prepare the submission according to their guidelines and mail out.

Once a manuscript is submitted begin a new one. It will keep the mind busy on the new and not focused on the submission out in the mail. Considering, most response times are usually three to four months. Remember with each submission a writer gets closer to acceptance and publication.

Bio:
Donna McDine is an award-winning children's author, Honorable Mention in the 77th and two Honorable Mentions in the 78th Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competitions, Preditors & Editors Readers Poll 2010 Top Ten Children’s Books, Global eBook Awards Finalist Children’s Picture Book Fiction, and Literary Classics Seal of Approval Picture Book Early Reader ~ The Golden Pathway.
Her stories, articles, and book reviews have been published in over 100 print and online publications. Her interest in American History resulted in writing and publishing The Golden Pathway. Donna has three more books under contract with Guardian Angel Publishing, Hockey Agony, Powder Monkey, and A Sandy Grave. She writes, moms and is the Editor-in-Chief for Guardian Angel Kids, Publicist for the Working Writer’s Club, and owner of Dynamic Media Release Services from her home in the historical hamlet Tappan, NY. McDine is a member of the SCBWI.


Learn more about Donna’s writing career at: http://www.donnamcdine.com/, opt-in to her Write What Inspires You Newsletter and receive a FREE e-book copy of “Write What Inspires You! Author Interviews.”

Write for the Reader, Not for Yourself

  By Karen Cioffi Years ago, a client told me that I don’t write for the client; I don’t even write for myself; I write for the reader. This...