Showing posts with label pandemic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pandemic. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Writing Through 2020, Or Not with Terry Whalin


In light of the unprecedented and scary year we've had, we thought it'd be a good idea to share our 2020 in regard to how the year affected our writing and our lives.

 
Today, Terry Whalin shares his experience:
 
By Terry Whalin @terrywhalin
 
As we end this strange year of 2020, I've turned to my writing more than ever.
 
I began the year with lots of conferences on my schedule and travel plans. As an editor, I find many authors at these events and they are productive for my career in publishing. In February I spent five intense days at a Book Funnel Bootcamp and learned a great deal plus built this site for my 10 Publishing Myths book.
 
In March, I traveled to Nashville for a red carpet event with my Morgan James authors and colleagues. The worldwide pandemic was just beginning and my wife questionned whether I should attend—but I did. It marked my last time to travel for the year since my other events were cancelled. On the way home, my plane backed up from the gate and the pilot announced they were closing all of the ski resorts in Colorado. They gave the passengers one opportunity to get off and stay in Nashville. My plane was loaded with parents and children headed to ski and about half of my airplane left the flight and stayed in Nashville—and the airline would have to straighten out their baggage later.
 
Throughout the months that followed, I continue to find new authors and sign them at Morgan James but I was less active than in years past because of the pandemic. With the additional free time, I turned to my writing and producing books for others. One of those books has been completed and a second one is nearing completion. These books are ones I write for others (and my name may or may not appear on the printed book). It's just one of the pivots that I've experienced during this “different” 2020.
 
My Writing Tip:
 
Publishing is still active and books are selling. At Morgan James we published and launched over 200 new titles this year. Editors and agents may be working at home but they are still actively reading and responding to pitches and proposals. I encourage each of us to keep our fingers on the keyboard and keep pitching our projects. The more you knock on the doors, the more they will open for you. There are many opportunities but these opportunities will not come to you. You have to be actively looking for them.
 
Tweetable:

Even with a worldwide pandemic, publishing is still active. Get ideas here for your writing from this prolific editor and writer. (ClickToTweet)

W. Terry Whalin is an acquisitions editor at Morgan James Publishing. His work contact information is on the bottom of the second page (follow this link).  He has written for over 50 magazines and more than 60 books with traditional publishers. His latest book for writers is 10 Publishing Myths, Insights Every Author Needs to Succeed. Get this book for only $10 + free shipping and over $200 in bonuses. One of Terry's most popular free ebooks is Straight Talk From the Editor, 18 Keys to a Rejection-Proof Submission. He lives in Colorado and has  190,000 twitter followers

 


 

Monday, June 22, 2020

Ideas For Handling Change


By Terry Whalin @terrywhalin

We can easily mark 2020 as a year of incredible change. A year ago, I would not have imagined our world would face a worldwide pandemic and a lock down of our country—and other countries around the world. Businesses including bookstores have come to a screeching halt.

Some of my writer friends tell me they have stopped writing and can't sit at their computer. I understand the distraction but I also have some ideas for you about how to handle change. Pandemic or not, the world of publishing is always shifting and changing. Publications start and publications close. Publishers open and then some publishers close their doors. Editors come and editors go. Yet books and magazines continue to be made and sold. With the pandemic, a number of conferences cancelled. Other events moved to become virtual online.

I've learned to use several new tools or services lately. Instead of standing in line at the post office (which I have done for hours over the years to mail my books), I've signed up at Stamps.com and I'm printing my own postage (media mail for books), then taking them to the post office and dropping off my packages. If you sign up at Stamps.com for their free trial and getting $100 value--using the promo code, when it is completed, behind the scenes, they will give me $20 in free postage. Here's the promo code: C-HDZ9–YNV.

For years I've been using a cassette tape recorder for interviews—either in person or on the phone (using a simple recording device). Last week my old tape recorder broke. I've ordered a new one but the change forced me to look for alternative ways to handle my interviews. I belong to several online groups and ask them for recommendations. Several journalists recommended TapeACall. This phone app will not only record the call but transcribe it. Now the transcription isn't perfect but it's way better than transcribing the tape—especially if you take notes and correct the transcription right shortly after recording. From learning about this app and making this change, it is going to save me a lot of time.

One of the big recent changes that I've made started before the pandemic. In February, I took an intense book funnel boot camp to learn some new techniques for selling my 10 Publishing Myths (follow this link to check out the offer). The training involved using a number of different websites and tools. Some of the most successful Morgan James authors (bestselling year after year) are using these techniques. Will my new book become bestselling? I don't know but I'm trying it.

These ways are just a few of the changes I've made. How are you handling the various changes in our world? I have several recommendations:

1. Move to online events and virtual promotion. I have been promoting online for years but if you haven't been, now is a great time to jump into this process.

2. Be willing to try new services and new techniques. If something breaks or gets interrupted, look for new tools. Ask colleagues for recommendations, pick one and get started.

3. Keep writing and trying new publications and new opportunities. Even if you only write 20–30 minutes a day, that time at your keyboard is much better than doing nothing. Can you write a page a day? As you do, gradually increase your number of pages.

4. Continue pitching and knocking on doors—the opportunities are there. They may be harder to find but they are certainly there. Our book sales at Morgan James are up five percent. Magazines continue to be published and need your writing. Whether you are beginning or have been writing for years, every writer (including me) needs to pitch to get the opportunity.

How are you handling change? What tools or methods are you using? Let me know in the comments and I look forward to learning from you.

Tweetable:

When our world is changing, how to you handle it? Get ideas here from this prolific editor and author. (ClickToTweet)

 W. Terry Whalin is an acquisitions editor at Morgan James Publishing. His work contact information is on the bottom of the second page (follow this link).  His latest book for writers is 10 Publishing Myths, Insights Every Author Needs to SucceedOne of Terry's most popular free ebooks is Straight Talk From the Editor, 18 Keys to a Rejection-Proof Submission. He lives in Colorado and has over 200,000 twitter followers

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Diversify In An Ever-Changing World


By Terry Whalin @terrywhalin

In the last few weeks our world has gone through unimaginable changes. Many businesses have shut down and we are isolated in our homes to protect us from catching the covid-19 virus in a world-wide pandemic. Possibly your business has closed or you have been temporarily furloughed from your business. What can you do in this ever-changing world?


Years ago I recognized the temporary status of any “job.” Publishing has gone through many changes during my years in this business. One of the key action steps you can take is to diversity your income stream. Where do you earn your money? Is it one place? Then I'm encouraging you to create different ways to earn money. Another way to put it is to use an old cliche: Don't put all of your eggs in one basket.

If we've learned anything in recent weeks, jobs and work can be uncertain. One of the best ways to hedge this possibility is to create different streams of income. For example, can you use your book as a springboard to create other information products that you sell online? If you want to know more details, I recommend you listen to this free interview I did with Bob Bly and look at the free Ebook with it.
Can you use your book and create an online course or membership site where you deliver content instruction and insights for your audience? I have a risk-free Simple Membership System product to give you much more detail and insight. Notice my 30 day no questions asked love it or return it guarantee.

Can you use your book to launch a personal coaching program? Your book has made you an authority and now use that influence to begin another aspect of your writing life—coaching. You will have a limited number of people but it can also create a regular stream of income for your business.

The overall key for any author is to create multiple streams of income. This article only gives a few of the possibilities. As an acquisitions editor, I repeatedly see authors focus on their royalties (or they tell me about their lack of royalties). There are many dynamics in play with a publisher receiving and paying these royalties such as the slow rate that bookstores pay publishers—which is something many authors forget. In my view, the royalty focus is the wrong focus. As an author, you can't control your royalty payment. If it comes, terrific. There are many element I mentioned in this article that you as an author can control. Seize those elements for your focus and work on them. It will yield a far greater financial result.



Every author needs to continually work at building their platform and expanding their influence. If you want or need to know more about building an author platform, get my free ebook on the topic. You can do it but it will take effort and initiative on your part. From my experience, it is not a simple one-two-three process but the journey is different for every author. Keep at it and if I can help you, just reach out to me and let me know what you need.

What action steps are you taking to diversity in this ever-changing world? Let me know in the comments below.

Tweetable:


One of the best actions is to diversity in an ever-changing world. Get ideas and insights from this prolific editor and author.  (ClickToTweet)
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W. Terry Whalin is an acquisitions editor at Morgan James Publishing. His work contact information is on the bottom of the second page (follow this link).  His latest book for writers is 10 Publishing Myths, Insights Every Author Needs to SucceedOne of Terry's most popular free ebooks is Straight Talk From the Editor, 18 Keys to a Rejection-Proof Submission. He lives in Colorado and has over 200,000 twitter followers 

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