Showing posts with label audience. Show all posts
Showing posts with label audience. Show all posts

Thursday, March 22, 2018

The Writing Life Details Are Important


By W. Terry Whalin

Let me begin with good news. Every writer can learn the skill of handling the details. Some of us are only focused on the big picture with our writing. We are determined to complete a particular book or magazine article and writing on it every day to meet this goal. Yet the craft of your words and storytelling is important. Are you sending it to the right editor? Are you using the correct spelling of that editor's name? The details matter.


A while ago, I purchased all of the remaining copies of Book Proposals That Sell. With over 130 Five Star reviews and great feedback about this book over the years, I know it has helped many writers to succeed in the world of publishing—no matter what type of book you write. I wrote this book from my passion as a frustrated acquisitions editor to help writers send better submissions. If you don't have a copy, it has never been so inexpensive and available only from me. Follow the link to learn more details.

As a part of this effort, I purchased a website, wrote the words for that website, created special bonuses and have been telling others about this effort through emails, articles and twitter. In the process of setting up this launch, I created five emails on autoresponders. These autoresponders contained the bonus items for those who purchased the book.

During this creation process, I received an email from one of these people who purchased Book Proposals That Sell. He had not received these bonus item emails. The email clued me that something was wrong some place in the process. I investigated my shopping cart and learned that I neglected to click one button in one place. From working with computers for years, I've learned one simple truth: the computer only does what you tell it to do.  I had skipped one important detail and no one got their bonus items. Talk about embarrassing! To straighten it out, one by one, I sent all five bonus items via email to each individual. Now that my shopping cart is fixed, the process of sending these bonuses is automated.

There are several lessons for you from my experience:

1. The details are essential. As writers, you ignore them at your own peril. Your submissions will not hit the target nor get results if you do not work at the details.

2. Listen to your audience. When they tell you something, spring into action or make adjustments.

3. Deliver on your promises. Your word and integrity are important. And if something goes wrong, apologize (everyone is human) and then fix it as soon as possible.

4. Work hard to maintain and keep your relationships. Years ago, I heard John Kremer, author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Book say, “Selling books is all about building relationships.” See the truth in this statement?

Whatever you are writing or promoting, the relationship is critical and the details of your writing life are important.

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W. Terry Whalin is an acquisitions editor at Morgan James Publishing and the author of more than 60 books including Book Proposals That $ell, 21 Secrets to Speed Your Success (available exclusively through this website with bonuses even though this book has over 130 Five Star Amazon reviews). He blogs about The Writing Life and lives in Colorado and has over 200,000 twitter followers.

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Why are the details of your writing life important? Here's four practical lessons. (ClickToTweet)

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Friday, September 16, 2016

Grow Your Readership with e-Newsletters

 
A monthly e-Newsletter is an emailed publication containing news of interest for your community and is another way to deliver useful content to your readers.  A Newsletter can be referred to as a Digest to recap significant posts at month-end.

The advantages of sending a Newsletter by email include:
• Publish on a regular schedule,
• Readers expect its arrival vs a SPAM hit,
• Use your brand as the header and title,
• Showcase a main article,
• Highlight important posts from the current month and those archived via links,
• Notifications for future events, workshops, and conferences,
• Tips of interest you want to promote,
• Images to support your message.


The disadvantages include:
• Commitment to publish on a regular basis,
• The format can be time consuming to prepare,  simplify it by using a vertical layout without sidebars,
• Readers may stash it away to “read later” when more convenient.


Before you send out your first edition, be sure you are able to commit to a regular monthly schedule.  Include a tool for automatic delivery registration.

Blogging is an important part of book marketing.  A Blog Newsletter is an excellent way to promote your work and the work of others you recommend. 

Always use; tags for each post, your motto, and illustrations to engage your readership. Many sites such as Pinterest are photograph driven.

I appreciate your feedback.  Please add it to the comment section below.  Thank you much! deborah

Deborah Lyn Stanley is a writer, editor and artist.  She is a retired project manager who now devotes her time to writing, art and caregiving mentally impaired seniors. 
She has independently published a collection of 24 artists’ interviews entitled the Artists Interview Series.  The series was also published as articles for an online news network and on her website: DeborahLyn Stanley - Writers Blog.  Deborah is published in magazines.  She is a blogger who has managed several group sites including ones she founded.
“Write your best, in your voice, your way!”


Tuesday, August 16, 2016

6 Tips to Grow Your Readership & Manage Your Content

We’ve talked about knowing your audience, delivering inspiring topics, creating value and gaining the readers’ attention consistently.  Our writing should always be focused, personable and authentic.  As we manage our content well, our readership will grow.  Let’s consider a few more tips.  

1. Invite post feedback through comments and linkup with other bloggers in your field.  It’s a good habit to respond to each comment.

2. Deliver present & timely content as well as evergreen content to your viewers.  Make it practical and useful.  Paying attention to your blog’s theme and your readers’ feedback is key for future posts.

3. Create tags for each post.  Using three relevant tags is a good practice and will facilitate your audience returning to search your archive.

4. Create a motto that is meaningful to you and memorable.  Use it consistently.

5. Invite a colleague to write a guest post for your site.  Or post an interview you have conducted with a colleague.  Be sure to include links to their website and ask them to link to your site as well.

6. Images and graphics are key attention grabbers making your message stronger. Use at least one image with each post.  Some bloggers elect to use the same graphic per recurring theme.  Would that work for you? 

We always appreciate your feedback.  Do you have questions or tip requests for me?  Thank you very much for reading!  deborah


Deborah Lyn Stanley is a writer, editor and artist.  She is a retired project manager who now devotes her time to writing, arting and caregiving mentally impaired seniors. 


She has independently published a collection of 24 artists’ interviews entitled the Artists Interview Series.  The series was also published as articles for an online news network and on her website: Deborah Lyn Stanley - Writers Blog.  Deborah is published in magazines.  She is a blogger who has managed several group sites including ones she founded.
 
“Write your best, in your voice, your way!”



Saturday, July 16, 2016

6 Tips to Increase Your Blog Traffic

1. Who is your audience? 
Why are you writing?  To give them the goods, to make it worth their while to come to your site and spend time there.  If they find value for their time spent, they will come again.


2. Be Consistent.  Get in front of your audience often and consistently.  Keep on getting out there!  As soon as you publish a post, publish a teaser to your social media pages: Facebook, Google+, Twitter, etc.  Each teaser draws traffic back to your blog so be sure to include your Web URL address. 
 
3. Stay focused on your post topic and keep it relative to the theme of your blog.  Write about inspiring, empowering topics.  Staying on point will make it more powerful.  We only have a few moments to grab and keep our reader’s attention.  Go for it and capture those moments! 

For longer posts use the ‘read more’ function when drafting your post.  Blogger calls this function a “Jump” break.  WordPress calls it "insert read more tag". Using this function will not change your post; rather it creates a link to a separate page for your complete post.

4. Write your best, in your voice, your way.  Write to personally connect with your reader.  Write as you speak and use personal language so that the reader senses you are having a conversation with them directly.
 
5. Ask for comments.  Leave a question applicable to your post or a “What do you think?”  “Anything to add?” question at the conclusion to your post.  Questions generate reader comments as many want to respond to the conversation you have started.

6. Always proof your post before publishing.  I often revise my posts to remove passive wording and to be more concise.

Do you have a tip or question?  Please share it in comments; we all want to hear.
Thank you for reading - see you next time.  Together with you in this writing endeavor and wishing you the best!  deborah  Deborah Lyn Stanley - Writers Blog 

Friday, April 22, 2016

How To Grow A Large Twitter Following

Almost once a week, one of my writer friends will email a comment about my large twitter following (currently over 172,000). As one said,”I believe I'm pretty active on twitter and I only have about 9,000 followers. How did you get to such a large number without buying them?”

Yes you can buy the followers and in a short amount of time your amount of followers will radically jump from a low number to over 100,000. There are several problems with using this strategy. First it will cost you money but more importantly you will gain some credibility but mostly you will gain fake followers. These plastic followers will never engage you, take advantage of your content or care about your content. It will not help you get where you want to go in terms of real followers.


I've been on Twitter since June 2008 and consistently giving good content on twitter. If you watch my twitter feed you will see that it is not all my content but comes from others in the writing community and in my target market of publishing and writing. From my consistent involvement in twitter, I have had many great results in my writing life. Some people email me for help and I refer them to my blog or my Ebook products or my online courses. Other people I will encourage and actually acquire their books at Morgan James. Yes, it can begin on Twitter. 


From my years in publishing, I find many people want to have a large audience or following. Yet these same people never ask this question: are you willing to do the work to get this audience? I may not be the best writer in the room (still have a lot to learn all the time).  But I am a persistent and consistent writer. These two qualities are ones that you can acquire and build into our life as well.


A basic principle of Twitter is following other people. Some of those people you follow, will follow you back. I use a tool called Refollow.com (which costs $20 a month). In less than ten minutes, I can follow the followers of people in the publishing community (my target market). Every day I follow 800 new people. A certain percentage of these people will follow me back (increasing my followers). If they don't follow me after several days, then I unfollow them using the tool, Manage Flitter


Another key to grow your twitter following is to constantly give good content. I use the free tool Hootsuite to schedule my tweets throughout each day. If you watch my twitter feed, you will see that I'm posting almost every hour throughout the day. Also I try to include an image with each tweet. If you use an image, it has higher visibility and interest (more people read it). 


The reality is my large following didn't happen overnight. My numbers have been growing gradually—but steadily upward. In fact, I'm gaining about 100 new followers a day. I spend less than 30 minutes a day on Twitter—yet I consistently spend this time (day after day). I do it on the weekend and I do it during the week. I do it when I travel and I do it when I'm at home. If I have any “secret” it is that I've made my own system and use it every day. You can follow the same path if you want to develop this type of following for your own writing.

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W. Terry Whalin is the author of more than 60 books including Book Proposals That $ell and has written for more than 50 magazinesFollow this link to his speaking schedule. He is an acquisitions editor at Morgan James Publishing.

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Using Psychology to Write Characters

By Mindy Lawrence One of the first writers I fell in love with was Edgar Allan Poe. His gothic horror latched on to my mind. I was powerless...